Concepts Name lnstitution Elements of a public key directory One of the key elements of a public-key directory is certification authorities (CA). CA refers to the service which is tasked with the duty of issuing and invalidating certificates. This might just be a plain setup having a few (yet influential) scripts utilizing an open source certificate toolkit, OpenSSL, or a packaged solution like Microsofts Certificate Services (Stallings, 2011). The CA software makes it possible for one to organize the parameters for the certificates that will be issued by CA coupled with the prerequisites clients must complete so as to be able to sign up for a certificate.
Public and private keys are components of public-key directory as well. Each electronic certificate is linked to a key pair, i.e., a public and a private key. And as such, the public key will be encompassed in the certificate. As the name suggests, the information in the certificate is public and everyone can see it or at a minimum, those who will utilize the certificate will see it. ln contrast, the private key is private to the entity (Stallings, 2011). This means that the individual who utilizes the key is the only one who will be able to see the information. When encryption of information is done with the public key the private key is the only one that can decrypt it. Conversely, if encryption of information is done with the private key the public key is the only one that can decrypt it (Stallings, 2011).
Another element of a public-key directory is digital certificates. Once a certificate is issued by the CA it will encompass the public key coupled with other certificate information. Coupled with the private key a user is able to utilize the certificate to decrypt information conveyed to the user, or encrypt information that other people can decrypt and thus substantiate with the certificate itself (Stallings, 2011).
The last component is known as the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), and it is the typical security technology used to set up a link that is encrypted between a browser and a web server. This link makes sure that all the data that passes between browsers and the web servers remain confidential and vital. Generally, a web server needs an SSL Certificate to be able to build an SSL link (Stallings, 2011). Therefore, when an SSL is activated on the web one is prompted to complete several queries regarding the identity of the website and the company. The web server will then formulate a public and a private key.
A Public-Key Certificate A public-key certificate refers to a digital document that is used as proof of ownership of a public key. The certificate mainly encompasses information regarding the key, owner’s identity (information), and the electronic signature of the issuer (Buchmann, Karatsiolis, & Wiesmaier, 2013). The validity of the signature and the software’s trust on the issuer usually determines whether the key can be used to safely communicate with the certificate’s subject or not.
A tool used to create a Secure Shell public-key certificate using the Windows environment and reasons for recommendation Various tools can be used to create a Secure Shell public certificate utilizing windows. Examples include Gitbash, PuTTY, and Bitvise among others. ln this case the PuTTY tool is recommended.
PuTTY refers to a Free Open Source Software (FOSS) solution found in Windows and it makes it possible for users to build SSH keys and utilize them to gain access to Linux servers through an SSH connection (Edge et al., 2010).
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PuTTY refers to a Free Open Source Software (FOSS) solution found in Windows and it makes it possible for users to build SSH keys and utilize them to gain access to Linux servers through an SSH connection (Edge et al., 2010). There are various reasons as to why PuTTY is recommended. lt is simpler to configure and more stable. ln comparison to other tools, PuTTY is more persistent; this is because it makes it possible to recommence a remote session as soon as the connection is re-established after being interrupted. PuTTY has a simple-to-utilize graphical user interface, meaning that the user will utilize the tool efficiently and without any problems. This tool is also recommended because it supports numerous variations on the safe remote terminal. For instance, a number of terminal control series such as the Linux console series which are not supported by xterm are supported by PuTTY. The recommended tool is portable as well. Therefore, an individual who uses PuTTY can put it in a flash drive or even email oneself the copy for recovery anywhere ones required it. Another good thing about PuTTY is that it bolsters key-based SSH verification without having to recall the switches; with this tool, it is, therefore, possible to log in directly to file on demand (Edge et al., 2010). Finally, PuTTY allows one to save the details of connection making it possible to connect to any number of remote machines by simply double-clicking their profile in PuTTY-encompassing SSH keys and other configuration alternatives.
The process used to generate a public-key certificate using your recommended tool, challenges and best practices The following process can be used to generate a public-key certificate: 1. Download and set up the PuTTY tool. The link that is used to download the tool is normally provided, and in this case this link can be used: http://www.putty.org/
2. To access the tool, one just needs to click on the link. 3. The PuTTY program is then run on the computer. ln the process, a display of the PuTTY key Generator window appears.
4. The kind of key to create option is then set to SSH-2RSA. ln this case, the public-key is selected. 5. The generate key is clicked to produce the public key. As the program generates the key, the mouse is moved around the blank area as directed.
6. The generated public key is then saved by clicking the save button. 7. All the characters in the public key are then selected and pasted into the OpenSSH authorized keys file box.
8. Right-click within the chosen text and choose the copy option from the menu. 9. A text editor is then opened and the copied text is pasted.
10. The text file is saved by clicking the save button.
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10. The text file is saved by clicking the save button.
11. Choose the Export OpenSSH key option on the conversions menu.
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11. Choose the Export OpenSSH key option on the conversions menu. 12. Save the public key in the format of OpenSSH. 13. Export the generated public key to OpenSSL (which is installed in windows. This link can be used: http://www.openssl.org.)
14. A command prompt is then opened. 15. Follow the procedures that are displayed on the screen (NB: the exported public key will be used to generate the certificate) One of the main challenges of this tool has to do with the generation of certificates. For instance, the process of generating certificates is lengthy and intricate. As such, it requires one to be tech savvy. Otherwise, an individual will experience some difficulties in generating certificates. The tool has some best practices. The SSH port should be left at 22. However, if for some reason an individual requires to connect to a dissimilar port number, the value can just be changed.
The connection type should just be left at SSH.
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The connection type should just be left at SSH. This is because SSH is safe and has encrypted communications protocols formulated to make sure that the password and data are protected optimally (Edge et al., 2010).
The close window on exit settings should not be changed from the default value, i.e., “only on clean exit.”
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The close window on exit settings should not be changed from the default value, i.e., “only on clean exit.”
References Edge, C., Barker, W., Hunter, B., Sullivan, G., & Barker, K. (2010). Enterprise Mac Security: Mac OS X Snow Leopard. New York, NY: Apress. Buchmann, J. A., Karatsiolis, E., & Wiesmaier, A. (2013). lntroduction to Public Key
lnfrastructures. Berlin, Germany: Springer Science & Business Media. Stallings, W. (2011). Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

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