You have recently been employed as a Business Analyst and your boss has decided to send you on a short Enterprise Systems course. You have now returned from your course ad would like to demonstrate
your learning. Create an e-portfolio to provide a synopsis and reflection on your learning during
the course. You have been requested to document your learning in a portfolio that can be displayed on
your company’s intranet or knowledge portal. This way, the entire organization can access the document
and share in your newly acquired knowledge.
This assessment task will address the following ILOs:
• Evaluate and Integrate several information sources in analysing Enterprise Systems
• Describe the role of enterprise systems as part of the larger IT infrastructure of large scale organisations.
• Identify relevant considerations in the implementation of Enterprise Systems.
• Demonstrate communication skills to present a coordinated, coherent and independent exposition of knowledge
and ideas in dealing with Enterprise Systems.
Time allocation: Approximately 30-40 hours
Weighting: 30%
Submission: Using your student e-Portfolio account, create a link from Moodle to your Mahara page as
indicated on the submission link. You are required to prepare your responses to the assessment tasks as a
page in your Mahara e-Portfolio. (To be submitted in Week 11)
Referencing: Your portfolio should be a synthesis of ideas from a variety of sources expressed in your
own words. A minimum of 10 references is recommended. You should use the APA referencing style.
The University has published a style guide to help students correctly reference and cite information they
use in assignments (American Psychological Association (APA) citation style:
https://federation.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/313328/FEDUNI-GENERAL-GUIDE-TOREFERENCING-2016-EDITION_ed.pdf
Enterprise Systems
ePortfolio
Enterprise Systems Assessment Task
The Context
Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs)
Assessment Guidelines
Marking Criteria: A passing grade will be awarded to assignments adequately addressing all
assessment criteria. Higher grades require better quality and more effort. For example, a minimum is set
on the wider reading required. A student reading vastly more than this minimum will be better prepared
to discuss the issues in depth and consequently their report is likely to be of a higher quality. So before
submitting, please read through the assessment criteria very carefully. Marking guides are provided.
Feedback: Feedback will be provided by the lecturer/tutor via Mahara, and mark via Moodle, no later
than 2 weeks from the submission date.
An ePortfolio is a collection of digital files, images, videos that showcase competencies, skills,
application of knowledge and learning journey. The use of ePortfolios in various industries, disciplines
and processes is increasing world-wide, and is in some case the ‘norm’ for job applications or for
displaying educational learnings.
This assessment task has been designed to help document your learning of Enterprise Systems. It
comprises of both team and individual components:
e-Portfolio: An Introduction
About the Assessment
(i) Team Component
(a) Form a team of between 2 – 3 members.
(b) As a team, select ONE of the below-mentioned research topic and identify relevant peer-reviewed
articles.
• Digital Business Transformation through Enterprise Systems
• Enterprise systems integration with other organisational systems, such as Cyber-physical Systems and SCADA
Systems.
• Security of Enterprise Systems
• Enterprise Systems and Data Management
• Enterprise Systems’ integration with Internet of Things (IoT)
• Cloud-based Enterprise Systems
(c) Each member of the team is expected to select, and summarise (in 500 – 700 words) at least three
peer-reviewed articles (from those identified by the team). (3 Marks)
(d) As a team, write a report of about 3000 words based on the selected topic. The report must include at
least one case study to reflect the topic of discussion. All selected papers should be discussed and
integrated, hence forming the team report. (12 Marks)
(e) The team report should be submitted through Turnitin.
(f) Prepare a 10 minutes overview of the findings documented in your Team Report. (Presentations to
be organised in Week 10)
• The team presentation must include discuss the findings from the team’s research as presented in the team
report. (5 Marks).
(g) You will be assigned to review another team’s presentation.
• Write a brief review (half a page) of another team’s presentation (2.5 Marks).
(ii) Individual Component
• Create a good looking and engaging ePortfolio page titled “Your Name_Student number_Enterprise Systems” (5
Marks)
• Upload your individual summary in your ePortfolio
• Upload your team report in your ePortfolio
• Upload your team presentation in your ePortfolio
• Upload your review of another team’s presentation in your ePortfolio
• Write a short reflection (300 words) on your growth and learning from your learning in ITECH 5402 (2.5
Marks)
Mahara e-Portfolio
Mahara allows students to create personal online spaces to access services, store work, create journals,
upload files, store resumes, embed social media resources from the web and collaborate with other users
in groups and so much more (CLIPP-FedUni).
Mahara can be accessed via the link below:
https://eportfolios.federation.edu.au/
The use of portfolios for student learning and assessment has been a research area for over 35 years
(Lambert & Corrin, 2007). One of the primary arguments for e-Portfolios is its ability to demonstrate
authentic professional growth associated with practices and outcomes over time. Specifically in a
learning context, e-Portfolio presents an opportunity for analysing growth through reflective practice and
is in fact considered to represent the application of a “Framework for Illustrating and Evaluating Growth
Through Reflective Practice” developed by Pitts and Ruggirello (2012). e-Portfolios should be seen as a
holistic way in which students document their learning, understanding, and growth throughout their
college experience (Ring & Ramirez, 2012).
Creating e-Portfolios as an evidence of learning is an active and dynamic method of demonstrating
learning that includes a responsive and reflective reciprocal process. Lee and Pohio (2012)’s cyclical
approach for developing e-Portfolios particularly reflects how e-Portfolios can be useful for reflective
practice in teaching and learning.
Why e-Portfolio?
Students’ e-Portfolio will be a good indication of students’ development and progression. It is expected
to include a compilation of various aspects of the course, thus allowing students to demonstrate not only
their knowledge, but also attitudes and values, in addition to skills and competencies. This will be a
reflection of the unintended outcomes by allowing students to display creativity and personal intended
aims and outcomes of learning generated
Look through the selection of tutorials below to help navigate Mahara.
http://federation.edu.au/staff/learning-and-teaching/clipp/elearning-hub/eportfolios/how-to
Student Learning
e-Portfolio links and resources
Creating your e-Portfolio
The following time allocations are suggested:
Getting familiar with Mahara – 3 Hours
Planning your e-Portfolio – 2 Hours
Research – 10 Hours
Development – 15 Hours
Submission – 30 – 60 Minutes
Criteria/Score Very Good Good Satisfactory Unsatisfactory (0)
Layout
/1 mark
The eportfolio is easy to
read. Fonts and type size
vary appropriately for
headings, sub- headings
and text.
The eportfolio is
generally easy to read.
Fonts and type size vary
appropriately for
headings, sub- headings
and text.
The eportfolio is often
difficult to read due to
inappropriate use of
fonts and type size for
headings, subheadings, text or long
paragraphs.
The eportfolio is difficult
to read due to
inappropriate use of fonts,
type size for headings,
sub- headings and text and
font styles (italic, bold,
underline).
Writing
Conventions
/0.5 marks
There are no errors in
grammar, capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling.
There are a few errors
in grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling. These require
minor editing and
revision.
There are four or more
errors in grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation, and
spelling requiring
editing and revision.
There are more than six
errors in grammar,
capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling
requiring major editing
and revision.
Multimedia
Elements
/0.5 marks
All of the photographs,
concept maps,
spreadsheets, graphics,
audio and/or video files
effectively enhance
understanding of
concepts, ideas and
relationships, create
interest, and are
appropriate for the
chosen purpose.
Most of the graphic
elements and
multimedia contribute
to understanding
concepts, ideas and
relationships, enhance
the written material and
create interest.
Some of the graphic
elements and
multimedia do not
contribute to
understanding concepts,
ideas and relationships.
The graphic elements or
multimedia do not
contribute to
understanding concepts,
ideas and relationships.
The inappropriate use of
multimedia detracts from
the content.
Marking Guide – Individual Component
Introductory
Section
/1 mark
Introduces the topic of
the report in an
extremely engaging
manner which arouses
the reader’s interest.
Gives a detailed general
background and
indicates the overall
“plan” of the portfolio
page.
Introduces the topic of
the report in an
engaging manner which
arouses the reader’s
interest. Gives some
general background and
indicates the overall
“plan” of the portfolio
page.
Satisfactorily
introduces the topic of
the report.
Gives a general
background.
Indicates the overall
“plan” of the portfolio
page.
Introduces the topic of the
report, but omits a general
background of the topic
and/or the overall “plan”
of the portfolio page.
Discussion of items
included in
portfolio
/2 marks
All items discussed in
depth. Displays deep
understanding of the
context.
Displays sound
understanding of the
context with some
analysis of issues and
no irrelevant
information
Most items are
adequately discussed.
Displays some
understanding and
analysis of issues.
Inadequate discussion of
issues Little/no
demonstrated
understanding or analysis
of most issues and/or
some irrelevant
information.
Individual
Summary
/3
Displays deep analysis
of issues.
Displays sound
understanding with
some analysis of issues
Displays some
understanding and
analysis of issues.
Inadequate discussion of
issues.
Reflection
/2.5
All reflections illustrate
the ability to effectively
critique work and
provide suggestions for
constructive practical
alternatives.
Most of the reflections
illustrate the ability to
effectively critique
work and provide
suggestions for
constructive practical
alternatives.
A few reflections
illustrate the ability to
effectively critique
work and provide
suggestions for
constructive practical
alternatives.
The reflections do not
illustrate the ability to
effectively critique work
or provide suggestions for
constructive practical
alternatives.
Sub total
/10.5
Score Very Good Good Satisfactory Unsatisfactory (0)
Layout
/1 mark
Information is well
organized, well written,
and proper grammar and
punctuation are used
throughout. Correct
layout used.
Information is organized,
well written, with proper
grammar and
punctuation. Correct
layout used.
Information is
somewhat organized,
proper grammar and
punctuation mostly
used. Correct layout
used.
Information is somewhat
organized, but proper
grammar and
punctuation not always
used. Some elements of
layout incorrect.
Marking Guide – Team Component
Structure
/1 mark
Structure guidelines
enhanced
Structure guidelines
followed exactly
Structure guidelines
mostly followed.
Some elements of
structure omitted
Introduction
/1 mark
Introduces the topic of
the report in an
extremely engaging
manner which arouses
the reader’s interest.
Gives a detailed general
background and
indicates the overall
“plan” of the paper.
Introduces the topic of
the report in an engaging
manner which arouses the
reader’s interest.
Gives some general
background and indicates
the overall “plan” of the
paper.
Satisfactorily introduces
the topic of the report.
Gives a general
background.
Indicates the overall
“plan” of the paper.
Introduces the topic of
the report, but omits a
general background of
the topic and/or the
overall “plan” of the
paper.
Discussion of topics
/4marks
All topics discussed in
depth. Displays deep
analysis of issues with
no irrelevant info.
Consistently detailed
discussion. Displays
sound understanding with
some analysis of issues
and no irrelevant
information
Most topics are
adequately discussed.
Displays some
understanding and
analysis of issues.
Inadequate discussion of
issues Little/no
demonstrated
understanding or
analysis of most issues
and/or some irrelevant
information.
Case Study
/2 marks
Case study clearly
reflects at least one of
the points discussed and
the lessons learned
Case study clearly
reflects the topic
discussed, but lessons are
not well abstracted
Case study is relevant
but does not clearly
reflect the point of
discussion
Case study is irrelevant
to the topic of discussion
Conclusion
/1 mark
An interesting, well
written summary of the
main points.
An excellent final
comment on the subject,
based on the information
provided.
A good summary of the
main points.
A good final comment on
the subject, based on the
information provided.
Satisfactory summary
of the main points.
A final comment on the
subject, but introduced
new material.
Poor/no summary of the
main points.
A poor final comment on
the subject and/or new
material introduced.
Referencing
/2 marks
Correct referencing
(APA). All quoted
material in quotes and
acknowledged. All
paraphrased material
acknowledged.
Correctly set out
reference list.
Mostly correct
referencing (APA). All
quoted material in quotes
&acknowledged. All
paraphrased material
acknowledged.
Mostly correct setting out
reference list.
Mostly correct
referencing (APA )
Some problems with
quoted material and
paraphrased material
Some problems with the
reference list.
Not all material correctly
acknowledged.
Some problems with the
reference list.
Team Presentation
/5 marks
A clear, interesting,
engaging, and well
communicated
presentation of research
findings.
A good summary of
research findings, lacking
much clarity and
engagement
Satisfactory summary
of the main research
points.
Poor summary of the
main points, lacking
clarity.
Critical Review
/2.5 marks
All reflections illustrate
the ability to effectively
critique work and
provide suggestions for
constructive practical
alternatives.
Most of the reflections
illustrate the ability to
effectively critique work
and provide suggestions
for constructive practical
alternatives.
A few reflections
illustrate the ability to
effectively critique
work and provide
suggestions for
constructive practical
alternatives.
The reflections do not
illustrate the ability to
effectively critique work
or provide suggestions
for constructive practical
alternatives.
SubTotal-
/19.5 marks
CLIPP-FedUni. Unit III – Setting up & using a Mahara eportfolio. Retrieved from
http://federation.edu.au/staff/learning-and-teaching/clipp/elearning-hub/eportfolios
Lambert, S., & Corrin, L. (2007). Moving towards a university wide implementation of an ePortfolio
tool. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 23(1), 1-16.
Lee, M., & Pohio, L. (2012). An e-portfolio theoretical approach for Provisionally Registered Teachers.
Paper presented at the ASCILITE-Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education
Annual Conference-Future challenges, sustained futures, Wellington, New Zealand.
Malloff, T. (2010). E-Portfolio Learning. Retrieved from
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_S6RENtE4_sg/TSiQWwGYTQI/AAAAAAAAB3o/-3-
ukhWQ3gg/s1600/EPortfolio_Learning__png_scaled1000.png
Mueller, J. (2016). Portfolios. Authentic Assessment Toolbox. Retrieved from
http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/portfolios.htm
Pitts, W., & Ruggirello, R. (2012). Using the e-Portfolio to Document and Evaluate Growth in
Reflective Practice: The Development and Application of a Conceptual Framework. International
Journal of ePortfolio, 2(1), 49-74.
Reardon, R. C., & Hartley, S. L. (2007). Program evaluation of eportfoliosNew Direction for Student
Services.
Ring, G., & Ramirez, B. (2012). Implementing ePortfolios for the Assessment of General Education
Competencies. International Journal of ePortfolio, 2(1), 87-97.
Vandervelde, J. (2016). EPortfolio (Digital Portfolio) Rubric. Retrieved from
https://www2.uwstout.edu/content/profdev/rubrics/eportfoliorubric.html
References
Export generated for Taiwo Oseni on 30 April 2019, 2:10 PM, from their portfolio at
ePortfolios@FedUni

~~~For this or similar assignment papers~~~