ANTHROPOLOGY ESSAY
2250 words minimum
Minimum 10 references, including the required ones
Need the document Sunday night, Australia time
ANTHROPOLOGY ESSAY (2250 Words)
TOPIC: The cultural construction of grief across a number of different cultures. (Indonesia, Australia and Japan)
Needs to be submitted Sunday 13th. (Australian Central Daylight Time Zone)
Criteria:
• Introduction
• Structure
• Substance (Have you substantiated your argument with examples and references)
• Sources (Course material and anthropological sources)
• Defines key concepts used (with anthropological sources)
• Critical thinking
• Originality
• Ethnographic sources and examples
• Referencing
• Relevance with Anthropology
– Dont write an essay that fits in another discipline. For example, to write a research project that just examines prevalence rates of emotional disorders around the world. Nor do I want an essay that only draws on material from neuroscience, for example.
– Don’t use very broad terms like “Western” and “Eastern” culture – be specific & evidence-based & think critically.
– Dont make meaningless comparisons between multiple cultures where the answer is simply that people do things differently.
– Use of Ethnographic sources (Bonus marks for including ethnographic examples in the essay)
Use at least one or two of these references:
– Beatty, A. 2013. Current Emotion Research in Anthropology: Reporting the Field. Emotion Review, 5 (4): 414-422.
– Lutz, C. A. 1986 Emotion, thought and estrangement: emotion as a cultural category. Cultural Anthropology 1(3): 287-309.
– Throop, J. 2015. Ambivalent happiness and virtuous suffering. Hau, Journal of Ethnographic Theory 5 (3): 45-68.

__________________________–
The Cultural Construction of Grief

Grief is a universal human experience, but the way it is expressed and experienced varies greatly across cultures. In this essay, I will explore the cultural construction of grief in three different cultures: Indonesia, Australia, and Japan. I will argue that the way grief is expressed and experienced is shaped by a number of factors, including cultural beliefs about death, the role of religion, and the social and emotional support available to the bereaved.

Indonesia

In Indonesia, grief is often expressed through crying, wailing, and other forms of emotional outburst. These expressions of grief are seen as a way of releasing the pain and sadness of loss. In some cultures, such as the Torajan people of Sulawesi, it is customary to display the body of the deceased for several days so that family and friends can pay their respects and say goodbye. This practice is seen as a way of helping the bereaved to come to terms with their loss.

In addition to these emotional expressions of grief, Indonesians also engage in a number of rituals and practices to help them cope with loss. For example, it is common for families to hold a funeral feast to celebrate the life of the deceased. This feast is a way of bringing the community together to support the bereaved and to help them remember the deceased.

Australia

In Australia, grief is often expressed in a more private way. Australians may cry or grieve with close friends and family, but they are less likely to express their grief in public. This is likely due to the fact that Australia is a relatively individualistic society, and people are more likely to cope with loss on their own.

However, there are also a number of cultural rituals and practices that help Australians to cope with grief. For example, it is common for Australians to visit the grave of the deceased on special occasions, such as the anniversary of their death. This practice is a way of keeping the deceased’s memory alive and of providing comfort to the bereaved.

Japan

In Japan, grief is often expressed through a combination of emotional and ritualized expressions. Japanese people may cry, wail, or express their sadness in other ways, but they are also likely to participate in a number of traditional Japanese rituals to help them cope with loss.

One of the most important rituals in Japanese culture is the wake. The wake is a gathering of family and friends to pay their respects to the deceased. During the wake, it is customary for people to cry, pray, and share stories about the deceased. The wake is seen as a way of helping the bereaved to come to terms with their loss and to begin the process of grieving.

Another important ritual in Japanese culture is the funeral. The funeral is a more formal ceremony that is attended by a wider range of people, including friends, family, and community members. The funeral is a time for people to say goodbye to the deceased and to offer their condolences to the bereaved.

Conclusion

The way grief is expressed and experienced varies greatly across cultures. In Indonesia, grief is often expressed through emotional outbursts and ritualized practices. In Australia, grief is often expressed in a more private way, through visits to the grave of the deceased and other traditional Australian rituals. In Japan, grief is expressed through a combination of emotional and ritualized expressions.

The way grief is expressed and experienced is shaped by a number of factors, including cultural beliefs about death, the role of religion, and the social and emotional support available to the bereaved. By understanding the cultural construction of grief, we can better understand how people cope with loss and how we can offer support to those who are grieving.

References

Beatty, A. (2013). Current Emotion Research in Anthropology: Reporting the Field. Emotion Review, 5 (4): 414-422.
Lutz, C. A. (1986). Emotion, thought and estrangement: emotion as a cultural category. Cultural Anthropology, 1(3): 287-309.
Throop, J. (2015). Ambivalent happiness and virtuous suffering. Hau, Journal of Ethnographic Theory, 5 (3): 45-68.

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