What is sensory processing disorder? Describe and discuss the symptoms. How does this relate to autism?

There is a great deal of discussion about the cause of autism. post your insights and findings. Along with your textbook, use the following article and video

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10803-011-1413-8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YIK2yXfrCfw

Sensory processing disorder (SPD) is a neurological condition that affects the way an individual receives and responds to sensory information from the environment. People with SPD may have difficulty processing information received through one or more of their senses, such as touch, taste, sight, sound, and smell. These difficulties can cause discomfort, anxiety, and confusion and interfere with daily functioning. Some common symptoms of SPD include:

Hypersensitivity: Overly sensitive to sensory stimuli, such as loud noises, bright lights, and certain textures.

Hyposensitivity: Under-sensitive to sensory stimuli, such as pain, heat, and cold.

Sensory seeking: Craving intense sensory input, such as spinning or jumping.

Sensory avoiding: Avoiding or withdrawing from sensory input, such as certain textures or sounds.

Motor clumsiness: Difficulty with coordination, balance, and fine motor skills.

SPD can co-occur with other conditions such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social communication difficulties and repetitive behaviors. Research has suggested that up to 80% of individuals with ASD may also have SPD. Both SPD and ASD can share similar symptoms, such as sensory sensitivity and difficulty with social interactions. However, it is important to note that SPD is not a diagnostic criteria for ASD and can occur in individuals without ASD as well.

The causes of ASD are not entirely understood, but research suggests that it is likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Studies have shown that certain genes may be associated with an increased risk of developing ASD, but no single gene has been identified as the sole cause of the disorder. Environmental factors such as prenatal exposure to toxins, maternal infection during pregnancy, and complications during birth have also been suggested as potential risk factors for ASD.

It is important to note that there is no scientific evidence to support the claim that vaccines cause autism. The article “The Evidence for the Safety and Efficacy of Vaccines” provides a comprehensive review of the current scientific literature on the topic and concludes that there is no evidence to support the claim that vaccines cause autism. Vaccines are an important public health tool that have been shown to be safe and effective in preventing serious diseases.

In conclusion, SPD is a neurological condition that can co-occur with ASD. While the causes of ASD are not entirely understood, research suggests that it is likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and there is no scientific evidence to support the claim that vaccines cause autism.

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