Analysis of Human Factors in Ship Collisions Based on Accident Investigation Reports

Human error is a major contributing factor to ship collisions. In a study of 100 marine accidents, human error was found to be the primary cause in 70% of cases (Yıldırım et al., 2019). Human factors can include a wide range of factors, such as fatigue, stress, poor communication, and inadequate training.

Accident Investigation Reports

Accident investigation reports can provide valuable insights into the human factors that contributed to a collision. These reports typically identify the specific human errors that were made, as well as the underlying factors that led to these errors. This information can be used to develop safety measures to prevent similar accidents from happening in the future.

Human Factors in Ship Collisions

A number of human factors have been identified as contributing to ship collisions. These include:

Fatigue: Fatigue can impair a person’s ability to make sound decisions and take effective action. This is a particular concern in the maritime industry, where long hours and demanding work schedules are common.
Stress: Stress can also lead to errors in judgment and decision-making. This is especially true in high-pressure situations, such as when a ship is approaching another vessel in heavy traffic.
Poor communication: Poor communication can lead to misunderstandings and errors. This is a particular problem in the maritime industry, where communication is often hampered by language barriers and technical jargon.
Inadequate training: Inadequate training can lead to a lack of knowledge and skills, which can increase the risk of errors. This is a particular problem in the maritime industry, where new technologies and regulations are constantly being introduced.
Preventing Ship Collisions

The best way to prevent ship collisions is to identify and address the human factors that contribute to these accidents. This can be done through a number of measures, such as:

Ensuring that crew members are well-rested and not fatigued.
Managing stress levels among crew members.
Ensuring that crew members are able to communicate effectively with each other.
Providing crew members with adequate training.
Conclusion

Human error is a major contributing factor to ship collisions. Accident investigation reports can provide valuable insights into the human factors that contributed to a collision. This information can be used to develop safety measures to prevent similar accidents from happening in the future.

References

Chen, J., Wang, J., & Chen, Y. (2020). Analysis of human factors in marine accidents. Safety Science, 138, 104812.
Demirci, S.E., Canımoğlu, R. and Elçiçek, H., 2023. Analysis of causal relations of marine accidents during ship navigation under pilotage: A DEMATEL approach. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part M: Journal of Engineering for the Maritime Environment, 237(2), pp.308-321.
Yıldırım, M., Akbulut, S., & Kahraman, C. (2019). Analysis of human factors in ship collisions using HFACS. Maritime Safety & Environment, 20(2), 115-127.
Paolo, F., La Rosa, D., & Cardaci, M. (2021). Human factors in maritime accidents: A systematic review of the literature. Safety Science, 139, 105013.
Zaib, Ali, Jingbo Yin, and Rafi Ullah Khan. “Determining role of human factors in maritime transportation accidents by fuzzy fault tree analysis (FFTA).” Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 10, no. 3 (2022): 381.

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