Assessment one: Report on physical, Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Development

Content
1. How many developmental domains do I need to cover?
• You need to address four developmental domains: physical, cognitive, social and emotional.
• The focus of this assessment is on the typical development of each of these four domains.
2. What developmental stage can I choose?
• You only need to choose ONE developmental stage: Early childhood, Middle childhood, Early adolescence or Middle adolescence.
• You need to provide the age range for this stage. Different sources have slightly different age ranges for these stages, and you can go with the one you prefer (it does not have to be the set textbook) so long as you provide the reference.
3. How many pedagogical strategies do I need?
• You only need to discuss ONE strategy per domain.
• The strategy you promote would be based on the milestone and needs (implications for learning and teaching) you identified for the age group. You need to discuss what the strategy is (name it), why it works for children/students at this age group and in supporting their development in this domain and how it can be implemented.
4. What is a pedagogical strategy?
• A pedagogical strategy is a teaching strategy, or a teaching method, that is used/implemented by teachers to help students learn or develop.
• A pedagogical strategy (teaching strategy) should be more specific than an approach (e.g. student-centred learning or teacher-directed learning), or a theory (for instance, behaviourism or humanist teaching theory). The States’ Department of Education websites and some other government websites, for instance ACARA, AITSL, have some great resources/examples of teaching strategies to get you started. For instance:
• https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/practice/improve/Pa
ges/hits.aspx
• https://education.nsw.gov.au/teaching-and-learning/student-assessment/smart-teaching-
strategies
• https://www.aitsl.edu.au/tools-resources
• https://www.sdera.wa.edu.au/media/1398/keys-for-life-teaching-learning-
strategies.pdf
Structure
1. Do I need an introduction and a conclusion?
• No, do not include an introduction nor a conclusion. Go straight into answering the questions of the milestones, implications and strategies.
2. How can I structure the responses?
• Use headings (and subheadings) to structure your assignment.
• The recommended structure is:
3. Can I use dot points?
• Dot points can only be used in the “milestones” section if you prefer. For all the other sections, please present your responses in paragraphs without dot points or tables or images.
• Please check out this Uniskills resource from the Curtin library for how to structure a paragraph:
https://uniskills.library.curtin.edu.au/assignment/writing/essays/#paragraph-
structure
Referencing
1. Does the set textbook need to be used as a reference?
• Yes, the set textbook (Duchesne et al., 2022) must be cited in your assignment as a reference as per the marking rubric.
2. How many academic references in total do I need?
• Generally, 8-10 scholarly sources plus the textbook in total for the whole assessment is a minimum expectation. 12-15 would be reasonable.
• The authentic and effective use of sources is the most important, rather than only pursuing the number of sources. Check out this UniSkills resource on citing in your writing: https://uniskills.library.curtin.edu.au/assignment/citing-in-your-
writing/introduction/
• Using a combination of different types of references is better than only using textbooks.
• You are expected to conduct your own research for additional sources.
3. What are acceptable academic references or credible sources?
• Acceptable academic references are textbooks, research-based articles from scholarly, peer reviewed journals, and information from scholarly, government based or supported web sources (often with a designated purpose of supporting education).
• Websites with these domains (the URL ending) generally have reliable information: .org (a registered organisation); .edu (an educational institution); .gov (a government agency), .gov.au (an Australian government agency).
• For more information on evaluating online resources and effective internet searching, please check out this link:
https://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/c.php?g=909870&p=6553318
4. How old can references be?
• A good rule of thumb is to use sources published in the past 10 years.
5. What referencing style do we use?
• We use APA 7th referencing style in all the units in your Master of Teaching course. Check out the library referencing guide: https://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/apa-7
6. Are page numbers required for in-text referencing?
• Page numbers are required for all direct quotes, and are encouraged for paraphrased information in in-text referencing.
7. Are the references included in the word count?
• In-text references are included in the word count. The reference list is not included in the word count.
• The reference list should be on a separate page. Check out the sample reference list:
https://libguides.library.curtin.edu.au/ld.php?content_id=47814267
Presentation/format
1. Do I need a cover page? Is there a standard template?
• Yes, include a simple cover page. Elements to include: Unit name, assignment number or name, your name, tutor’s name, date due and your final word count. Limit font size to 16. Ensure cover-page is simple and without adornment.
• The old standard cover page template is no longer used since now assignments need to be submitted through Turnitin and using the template means Turnitin will highlight all the same information in the template.
2. What is the required format of presentation?
• Include a header (your name and unit code) and a footer (page number).
• Required format: 2.54 cm margins; size 12 font Arial or Times New Roman. Double line spacing.
• Save your work to Turnitin using the following format: Surname_Firstname_UnitCode_Ass1
• Save and submit your work as a Word document NOT a PDF.
AITSL Standards:
This assessment provides the opportunity to develop evidence that demonstrates these Standards:
1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students
1.2 Understand how students learn
1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds
2.5 Literacy and numeracy strategies
Physical, Cognitive, Social and Emotional Development Report.
Details:
Report on the typical development of a selected age group across four domains (physical, cognitive, social and emotional) with examples of appropriate teaching and learning strategies. Provide research-based evidence, with appropriate citations in each response, to support your work.
• Concisely explain what the term -milestone- means, and then for each of the four domains, outline (briefly explain) the key developmental milestones of a selected age group (early childhood, middle childhood, early adolescence, or middle adolescence).
• For each of the four domains, explain what classroom implications (impacts / consequences) the milestones of typical development could have for teaching and learning in this particular age group.
• For each of the four domains, describe one pedagogical strategy that takes into account typical developmental features. This pedagogical (teaching) strategy has been chosen because it will be directly applicable to the new skills / abilities / needs which children have, now that they’ve reached the new milestone. The strategy should also be applicable to the identified implication (impacts / consequences) identified in the second response. Ensure you use a different strategy for each of the domains.
General information:
• Support your responses with evidence from the set textbook and other academic references.
• Acceptable academic references are texts, research-based articles from scholarly, peer reviewed journals, and information from scholarly, government based or supported web sources (often with a designated purpose of supporting education).
• Place all references on a single reference list, on its own page, at the end of the assignment.
• Please present the assignment in paragraph form – without dot points (except in response one -milestones-), or tables, or images. Each response must have its own heading (e.g., -Part one-, or “Milestones”). You could also use basic sub-headings to provide clearly delineated elements in each response.
• Paragraphs should follow the normal ‘rules’ (if not sure, please review).
• Do not include an introduction nor a conclusion.
• It is strongly recommended that you paraphrase and summarise information effectively instead of using any direct quotations from sources to demonstrate your understanding and make your work more original.
Word count:
• 2,500 words plus or minus 10%. This includes all text (headings, in-text citations, and quotes). It excludes the reference list and cover page, which must be presented on separate pages.
Presentation:
• Required format: 2.54 cm margins; size 11 or 12 font Arial, or Times New Roman;
• All work (including the reference list) should double line spacing. Do not use single spacing.
• Do not include a contents page, nor an abstract.
• Include a cover page. Elements to include: Unit name, assignment number or name, your name, tutor’s name, date due and your final word count. Limit font size to 16. Ensure cover-page is simple and without adornment.
• Please include a header (your name and unit code) and a footer (page number).
• Submit your work as a Word doc. Do not submit a PDF.
• Save your work to Turnitin using the following format: Surname_Firstname_Unit Code_Assess1.
• Use APA (7th edition) format. It is important that both in-text referencing and end of text referencing are correct. This includes the setting out of the reference list as well as formatting for each citation.
o Please remember that you must have a clear understanding of

Milestones in Early Childhood Development

Early childhood development is a critical period in a child’s life. During this time, children are rapidly learning and growing in all areas of development, including physical, cognitive, social, and emotional.

Physical Development

In the area of physical development, children in early childhood make significant gains in height, weight, and motor skills. They learn to walk, run, jump, climb, and throw. They also develop fine motor skills, such as the ability to hold a pencil and write.

Cognitive Development

In the area of cognitive development, children in early childhood learn about the world around them through exploration and play. They develop their problem-solving skills and begin to understand basic concepts such as numbers, letters, and colors.

Social Development

In the area of social development, children in early childhood learn to interact with others and develop relationships. They learn to share, take turns, and cooperate. They also begin to develop a sense of self-awareness and identity.

Emotional Development

In the area of emotional development, children in early childhood learn to express their emotions in a healthy way. They learn to manage their anger, sadness, and fear. They also develop a sense of self-control and self-regulation.

Classroom Implications of Early Childhood Development

The milestones of early childhood development have important implications for the classroom. Teachers need to be aware of the developmental needs of their students in order to provide them with the appropriate instruction and support.

Physical Development

In the area of physical development, teachers need to provide opportunities for children to move and explore their environment. They can do this by providing a variety of toys and equipment, such as blocks, balls, and puzzles. They can also create a safe and inviting environment where children feel comfortable moving around.

Cognitive Development

In the area of cognitive development, teachers need to provide opportunities for children to learn and explore. They can do this by providing a variety of materials and activities, such as books, puzzles, and manipulatives. They can also create a stimulating environment where children are encouraged to ask questions and explore their surroundings.

Social Development

In the area of social development, teachers need to provide opportunities for children to interact with others and develop relationships. They can do this by providing opportunities for children to play together, work together, and solve problems together. They can also create a positive and supportive environment where children feel safe and accepted.

Emotional Development

In the area of emotional development, teachers need to provide opportunities for children to express their emotions in a healthy way. They can do this by providing a safe and supportive environment where children feel comfortable talking about their feelings. They can also teach children coping skills, such as deep breathing and relaxation techniques.

Pedagogical Strategies for Early Childhood Development

There are a variety of pedagogical strategies that can be used to support early childhood development. Some of these strategies include:

Play-based learning: Play is a natural way for children to learn and explore. Teachers can provide opportunities for children to play with a variety of materials and toys, such as blocks, puzzles, and manipulatives.
Problem-based learning: Problem-based learning is a hands-on approach to learning that allows children to solve real-world problems. Teachers can provide children with opportunities to solve problems by working in groups, researching information, and developing solutions.
Project-based learning: Project-based learning is a long-term approach to learning that allows children to explore a topic in depth. Teachers can provide children with opportunities to work on projects that involve research, collaboration, and problem-solving.
Differentiation: Differentiation is the practice of tailoring instruction to meet the individual needs of each student. Teachers can differentiate instruction by providing different levels of challenge, using different learning styles, and providing different types of support.
Assessment: Assessment is an ongoing process that allows teachers to track student progress and identify areas of need. Teachers can use a variety of assessment methods, such as observation, portfolios, and quizzes.

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