What’s the connection between age and increased risk of dying from high blood glucose?
The connection between age and increased risk of dying from high blood glucose is a complex and multifaceted topic that requires careful examination of various factors. High blood glucose, also known as hyperglycaemia, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and can lead to serious damage to many of the body’s systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths in 2019, and another 460 000 kidney disease deaths were caused by diabetes. Moreover, raised blood glucose causes around 20% of cardiovascular deaths, which are the top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes.

One of the factors that influences the risk of dying from high blood glucose is age. The younger a person who receives a type 2 diabetes diagnosis is, the higher the risk that diabetes-linked complications will shorten their lifespan. This is because younger people with type 2 diabetes have more years of exposure to high blood glucose levels and its consequences than older people who develop the condition later in life. Additionally, younger people with type 2 diabetes may have more difficulty adhering to treatment and lifestyle changes that can help prevent or delay the onset of complications. Therefore, age at diagnosis is an important predictor of mortality risk for people with type 2 diabetes.

Another factor that affects the risk of dying from high blood glucose is health status. People with diabetes often have other chronic conditions that can worsen their prognosis and increase their mortality risk. For example, people with diabetes are more likely to have hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity and chronic kidney disease, which are all risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, people with diabetes may have different levels of functional impairment, cognitive decline, frailty and disability that can affect their quality of life and ability to manage their condition. Therefore, health status is a key determinant of mortality risk for people with diabetes.

In conclusion, age and health status are two important factors that connect high blood glucose and increased risk of dying. People with diabetes should be aware of these factors and take steps to control their blood glucose levels and prevent or treat complications. A healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with medication and regular screening and treatment for complications.

Bibliography/References
[1] WHO. Diabetes [Internet]. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2023 [cited 2024 Mar 10]. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/diabetes
[2] How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy [Internet]. Healthline; 2020 [cited 2024 Mar 10]. Available from: https://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes-life-expectancy
[3] Type 2 diabetes and life expectancy: Risk factors and tips [Internet]. Medical News Today; 2019 [cited 2024 Mar 10]. Available from: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317477
[4] American Diabetes Association Framework for Glycemic Control in Older Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: A Consensus Report [Internet]. Diabetes Care; 2021 [cited 2024 Mar 10]. Available from: https://diabetesjournals.org/care/article/44/7/1524/138816/American-Diabetes-Association-Framework-for

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