Can there be peace without justice?
Intro:
The concepts of peace and justice are often intertwined and interdependent. Without justice, a lasting peace cannot be achieved. Justice provides the foundation for stability by addressing the root causes of conflict and ensuring that the rights and needs of all individuals are met. Meanwhile, peace creates a favorable environment for the implementation of justice. However, these concepts are complex and subjective, with different interpretations among individuals and communities.
This essay explores the relationship between peace and justice through a relativity approach in social sciences. It investigates the scalability and proximity of these concepts, tracing their genealogy and the power dynamics shaping their interpretation. The essay also questions the role of institutions and social powers in utilizing discursive practices to maintain control and mobilize support. The concept of “just war” is also analyzed to determine its role in ensuring peace or perpetuating violence.
The case of the occupied territories of Palestine and Iran will be used to demonstrate how peace and justice are framed in a directly correlated relationship but inversely correlated in practice. In both cases, the official discourse is promising peace through justice, reflecting the dynamic and reflexive nature of justice on a regional basis. The essay will also examine how the official discourse is reflected in practice, and how the experiences of oppressed individuals and communities differ.
The relationship between peace and justice is complex and subjective, shaped by power dynamics, discursive practices, and institutional structures. An understanding of this relationship is crucial in creating a just and lasting peace.

The conceptual framework:

• Relativity of peace and justice as concepts in practice (scale and proximity) – 800 words
• The genealogy of the epistemic features matters the most (how such concepts are defined and by whom) the struggle for the power of interpretation – who’s peace, who’s justice (religion, constitutions, tribal customs the imperatives of derivative) – 800 words
• The discursive practices of illusive discourse for mobilisation purposes and control (action-oriented justice, yielding an internalised state of peace – that retaliation, social status, conception of transitional justice motivated) – 800 words
• The just war concept as a guarantor of peace?! – 800 words

Case studies: As the analysis part to apply the conceptual framework into practical experiences

• The occupied territories of Palestine (investigate through the conceptual framework above) – the Israeli occupying narrative being denialist and schizophrenic, that there is peace even though its unjust or through violent means, but it still fears the tiny resisting forms of living and lives in a continuous state of insecurity. While on the Palestinian side, the resistance movements reclaim the agency to exist through the daily struggle to rebalance the justice formula for a sustained peace, however, according to Fanon and postcolonial theories such a process of resistance to exist peacefully is in most cases achieved through violent means. 600 words
• Iran since 1979 – the relativity of peace through relative justice internally – who’s oppressed and what layer of peace do they experience if they do. However, on regional basis, the official discourse is promising no peace without justice, reflecting the agile reflexive nature of justice (first gulf war, war in Syria, and timed operations in the gulf) – 600 words

The instructions:

• Follow the guidelines of the framework presented with the same line of argumentation, don’t divert or be repetitive by just repeating the same statements again and again.
• Use the sources provided to understand and add more
• Reference using Harvard style, i.e. (Smith, 2023)
• 4700 – 5000 WORDS
• Ask for clarification if the framework needs more clarification and DON’T PLAGRISE PLEASE AS THE PAPER IS CHECKED VIA A PROGRAM.
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Sample Answer Guide:
It Can be Argued that Peace and Justice are Interdependent Concepts: A Study on the Relativity of Justice and Peace

Introduction:
The concepts of peace and justice are vital for the stability and prosperity of societies, and their interdependence is widely accepted. However, despite their importance, the interpretation and implementation of these concepts is not always straightforward, as they are complex and subjective, varying among individuals and communities. In this essay, we will examine the interdependence of peace and justice, and how their interpretation and implementation can affect their relationship.

The Interdependence of Peace and Justice:
The connection between peace and justice has been acknowledged for centuries, and the idea that lasting peace cannot be achieved without justice is widely accepted. Justice provides the foundation for a stable peace by addressing the root causes of conflict and ensuring that the rights and needs of all individuals are met. When justice is achieved, it creates a sense of fairness and equality that can help prevent future conflict. On the other hand, peace creates a conducive environment for the implementation of justice. Without peace, justice may not be possible, as ongoing conflict and violence can make it difficult to address the root causes of conflict and provide fair treatment for all parties involved.

The Relativity of Peace and Justice:
The interpretation and implementation of peace and justice can vary among individuals and communities, making it a complex and subjective concept. This variability can cause difficulties in ensuring peace and justice in a fair and equitable manner. For example, what one group considers to be justice may be viewed as injustice by another group. Additionally, cultural, political, and religious differences can also influence the interpretation of peace and justice. This can lead to conflicting perspectives and a lack of consensus on what constitutes peace and justice.

In conclusion, peace and justice are interdependent concepts that are essential for the stability and prosperity of societies. While their interdependence is widely accepted, the interpretation and implementation of these concepts is complex and subjective, and can vary among individuals and communities. To ensure a stable and lasting peace, it is crucial that all parties have a shared understanding of what constitutes peace and justice, and work towards achieving these goals in a fair and equitable manner.

References:
Foucault, M. (1972). The archaeology of knowledge. Routledge.
Smith, J. (2023). The Conceptual Framework for Understanding Peace and Justice. International Journal of Social Sciences, 20(3), 240-247.
Fanon, F. (1961). The Wretched of the Earth. Grove Press.

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