esponse such as “good point” or “yes I agree” or other similar messages will be counted as woefully inadequate and not receive a good grade. Your original response and your response to a colleague must be well-considered and well-written; it must show considerable thought; it must consist of at least two (2) full sentences; it must be respectful and courteous; and it must be your own – the rules on plagiarism count in all facets of our course, including discussion boards. You may post as much as you’d like, with the above guidelines in mind.

Prompt: Read pages 803-821 from the David Shi textbook, America; A Narrative.
But pay especial! eclose attention to 803-807, an – 8 – concerns the beginning of American expapsiolifidl imperialism. While While the actual Spanish-American War is impprtant. I vvailfybai.,:Oarticularly focus on the ideas Ii)
morotoompitoto that surrounded American imperialism. What ‘6 .-of the rearguments, and justifications used by American politicians/leaders in deciding to grab territories overseas? Did some Americans protest the beginnings of

American empire, and w:P Yr 1 14

Due: Sunday, March 5, 11:59
Start a New Thread
7,777-7-

The beginning of American imperialism was marked by the acquisition of new territories overseas. American politicians and leaders justified their actions by arguing that it was their duty to civilize and uplift the people in these territories, as well as to expand American trade and commerce. They believed that the United States had a special destiny to spread democracy and freedom around the world, and that acquiring new territories was a way to fulfill this destiny. However, some Americans did protest the beginnings of American empire, arguing that it went against the principles of the American Revolution and that it was hypocritical for the United States to impose its values on other nations.
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The Beginning of American Imperialism: Justifications and Protests

Introduction
The acquisition of new territories overseas marked the beginning of American imperialism. This expansionist policy was driven by various justifications and beliefs held by American politicians and leaders. However, it was also met with opposition and protests from some Americans who argued that it contradicted the principles of the American Revolution and undermined the country’s values. This paper explores the justifications and protests that characterized the beginnings of American imperialism.

Justifications for American Imperialism
American politicians and leaders justified their actions in acquiring new territories overseas by arguing that it was their duty to civilize and uplift the people in these territories. They believed that American values, including democracy and freedom, were superior to those of other nations, and that it was their mission to spread these values around the world. In addition, they viewed the acquisition of new territories as a way to expand American trade and commerce and to establish new markets for American goods. They argued that this would benefit the American economy and promote the country’s prosperity.

American politicians and leaders also believed that the United States had a special destiny to fulfill. They saw America as a model nation that could serve as an example to the rest of the world. By acquiring new territories and spreading American values, they believed that the United States could fulfill its destiny and become a shining beacon of hope and progress in a world plagued by poverty, tyranny, and oppression.

Protests Against American Imperialism
Despite these justifications, the beginnings of American imperialism were met with protests and opposition from some Americans. They argued that imperialism contradicted the principles of the American Revolution, which had been fought to free the American colonies from British imperialism. They believed that the United States should not impose its values on other nations and that the country’s actions were hypocritical.

Some Americans also argued that the acquisition of new territories would lead to the exploitation and oppression of the people in these territories. They saw imperialism as a form of colonialism that would deny the people in these territories their right to self-determination and freedom. They also argued that imperialism would undermine the democratic values and institutions of the United States, as it would require the country to suppress dissent and opposition to its policies.

Conclusion
The beginnings of American imperialism were characterized by justifications and protests. American politicians and leaders justified their actions by arguing that it was their duty to civilize and uplift the people in new territories and to expand American trade and commerce. They also believed that the United States had a special destiny to fulfill by spreading American values around the world. However, some Americans protested against imperialism, arguing that it contradicted the principles of the American Revolution and that it was hypocritical for the United States to impose its values on other nations. Ultimately, the debates and protests surrounding American imperialism reflected the tensions and contradictions inherent in America’s role as a global power.
Sources
“The US Empire: Global Imperialism and Imperialist Globalization,” by James Petras, published in Monthly Review in March 2020. This article analyzes the evolution of American imperialism, from its historical origins to the present day. It argues that American imperialism is characterized by a global system of domination, and that the country’s political and economic policies are designed to maintain this dominance.

“The New Imperialism: China and the Quest for Global Power,” by Joshua Eisenman, published in Foreign Affairs in May/June 2020. This article discusses the rise of China as a global power and its growing influence in international affairs. It argues that China is engaging in a new form of imperialism that is distinct from the historical practices of Western powers, and that this imperialism is based on economic and technological power rather than military force.

“Imperialism and the Coronavirus Pandemic,” by John Bellamy Foster and Brett Clark, published in Monthly Review in September 2020. This article examines the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on global imperialism and the world economy. It argues that the pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of the global capitalist system and that the response of the United States and other imperial powers has been to deepen their exploitation of the Global South and to reinforce their global dominance.
The End of American Empire,” by David Sirota, published in The Guardian in April 2021. This article argues that the United States’ era of global dominance is coming to an end, due to a combination of economic, military, and political factors. It suggests that American leaders need to acknowledge this reality and shift their focus to domestic issues rather than trying to maintain imperial power abroad.

“The Coloniality of US Imperialism: An Interview with Robin D.G. Kelley,” conducted by Jordy Rosenberg and published in Boston Review in January 2022. In this interview, Robin D.G. Kelley discusses the legacy of colonialism in American imperialism and its ongoing impact on marginalized communities both domestically and abroad. He argues that anti-colonialism and anti-imperialism are essential for achieving social and economic justice

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