After studying Module 4: Lecture Materials & Resources, discuss the following:

The St. Fleur family is well respected in the Haitian community because they are religious with great moral values. They moved to the United States because of political issues in Haiti. Ronald, the youngest son of this family, is 27 years old and lives at home with his mother and father. Recently, he began having fevers and subsequently developed pneumonia. He was admitted to the hospital, where laboratory tests were HIV positive. Ronald was in shock when the doctor informed him that he was HIV positive. He confessed to the doctor that he was gay, but he could not tell his family. He said that he did not want to bring shame to the family. Because he couldn’t be in a formal relationship disowning to his family and the Haitian community’s view of homosexuality, he has been very promiscuous over the years.

What are Haitians’ views of homosexuality?
If Ronald’s parents were to learn of his positive HIV status, how might they react if they are religious and traditional?
Identify three major culturally congruent strategies a healthcare provider can implement to address HIV prevention practices in the Haitian community?
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Introduction
The Haitian community has unique cultural values and beliefs that are essential for healthcare providers to understand to deliver culturally sensitive care. This paper aims to discuss Haitians’ views of homosexuality, the potential reaction of Ronald’s religious and traditional parents to his HIV positive status, and culturally congruent strategies that healthcare providers can implement to address HIV prevention practices in the Haitian community.

Haitians’ views of homosexuality
Haitian culture is deeply rooted in religion, where Catholicism and Vodou are the most dominant religions. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Haitians’ views on homosexuality are influenced by religious and cultural beliefs. Many Haitians view homosexuality as taboo and unacceptable because it goes against their religious and cultural norms (CDC, 2022). Additionally, some Haitians believe that homosexuality is a mental disorder or a result of sexual abuse (Alleyne, 2020). Thus, being gay is often stigmatized in the Haitian community.

Ronald’s parents’ potential reaction to his HIV positive status
If Ronald’s parents were to learn of his positive HIV status, they might react with shock, disbelief, and disappointment, especially since they are religious and traditional. In Haitian culture, parents are responsible for their children’s actions and decisions, and they may feel like they have failed as parents (Alleyne, 2020). They may also experience shame and humiliation in their community since HIV is often associated with promiscuity and deviant sexual behavior. Ronald’s parents may blame themselves for not raising their son properly and may also be afraid of being shunned by their community.

Culturally congruent strategies for HIV prevention practices in the Haitian community
Haitians’ cultural beliefs and practices significantly influence their views on health and illness. Healthcare providers can implement the following culturally congruent strategies to address HIV prevention practices in the Haitian community:

Partnering with Haitian religious leaders and community leaders: Haitians respect their religious leaders and community leaders, and partnering with them can help in disseminating HIV prevention messages in the community. These leaders can educate their followers on HIV prevention methods and also reduce stigma towards people living with HIV.

Providing healthcare services in Creole: Creole is the primary language spoken by Haitians, and providing healthcare services in Creole can help in breaking down communication barriers between healthcare providers and patients. It can also help in gaining trust from patients and improving healthcare access.

Incorporating Vodou beliefs in HIV prevention messages: Vodou is an essential aspect of Haitian culture and incorporating Vodou beliefs in HIV prevention messages can help in addressing cultural barriers towards HIV prevention. For example, using Vodou concepts such as “protecting one’s spirit” can help in promoting condom use and other safe sex practices.

Conclusion
In conclusion, understanding Haitian culture and beliefs is crucial for healthcare providers to deliver culturally sensitive care. Healthcare providers can implement culturally congruent strategies to address HIV prevention practices in the Haitian community. These strategies include partnering with religious and community leaders, providing healthcare services in Creole, and incorporating Vodou beliefs in HIV prevention messages. write my research paper owl essayservice uk writings. doing so, healthcare providers can reduce stigma towards people living with HIV, improve healthcare access, and promote HIV prevention practices.

References:
Alleyne, R. (2020). A cultural perspective on HIV/AIDS: the Haitian experience. American Journal of Public Health, 110(9), 1336-1338. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305838

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2022). HIV among Haitians. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/group/racialethnic/haitians/index.htm

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